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Reaching the Unreachable

A guide in understanding and aiding a culture of violence and destruction

Foreword
In urban America, it is a badge of honor to be called a “Nigga.” If you live in the inner city and you are not known as a “thug-ass Nigga,” you have no street credibility. If you have a job, attend school, get good grades and speak properly, you are most likely not heavily regarded, rather viewed as a square. A person with no street credibility gets no respect. To have respect is what one gets when he is getting paper (money), hoes or Bitches. Sadly enough, too many young and older people alike will spend their entire inner-city and incarcerated life attaining to be a Nigga who gets much street credibility.

People will be offended, outraged and I am sure a few protests, boycotts, marches and rallies will occur in response to this title. Great! I have achieved the goal. The goal is to anger people so much so that they do something that will evoke a positive change in the culture that all too well identifies themselves as Niggas.
What will be alarming is not the fact that there is a cultural demise occurring in urban America, however, that I had the audacity, the lack of class to entitle this book in such a way. If you have to wonder why I selected this title than you really have no idea about what is going on in urban America. Before one gets irate, indignant and be at the ready for protest, allow me to first borrow that angst for the usage of the word, “Nigga” and ask that people get angry, get up and become apart of a pre-existing movement that will allow us to help, and most importantly save our dying culture.

Many will wonder, why does a popular, white radio host get fired and protested against, yet this black woman gets to write a book with a title which includes such a hateful word. I am in no way singling out any specific person nor am humiliating a certain group of people. I say to you this, on the streets, which I will explore within the book’s contents are men, women and children who have adopted the mindset that one is not a real thug ass Nigga if he has not been incarcerated or in some cases shot, shot at or done the shooting.

When I first informed a few good friends and trusted colleagues of my intent to name this book, they attempted to dissuade me on the title. Others stated that this is the type of title that will grab someone’s attention. It is my hope that not only am I able to grab your attention but yet to encourage you so much so that you will join a movement to stop the endless flow of our people in and out of prison and the witnessing of endless tears and prayers at the ever too often, funerals.

In my defense of the book’s title, I am out there on the front line, devising campaigns to address the issues, taking valuable time away from my family, attending the marches, rallies, and candlelight vigils; therefore, I am allowed to use this word to describe to you what I see in this war. You see, don’t get upset with me for using this word if you are not in fact out on the front line with me. I will not apologize for explaining this culture in the manner in which I have chosen.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and various community organizations recently buried the word Nigga throughout the country. How can a word be buried if it lives on constantly every day in this culture? In a sense we buried alive a word that refuses to die. We can have ceremonies all day long, burying the word, yet the mentality breathes death into the lives of so many, each and every moment. I use this harmful word in the title not to judge, not to point fingers and call nasty-hurtful names, however so that we may grow and learn from those who often use this word, and who live the lifestyle of a culture filled with violence and sometimes a sense of hopelessness.

Comedian Chris Rock said, “I love Black people; but can’t stand Niggas.” Many Black people cringed when Mr. Rock stated his comments, and still we all knew good and well where he was coming from on this issue. Instead of us shaking our heads, rolling up our windows, locking our doors, and accelerating in our cars as we zoom through the hood to get away from those gloomy images standing on the corner with their baggy pants, braids in their hair, and 40-ounce bottles in their hands, let us come together and understand exactly how this culture operates.

This book will explore the lives of various people in the “hood,” it will provide insight as to what goes on behind the graffiti laden walls, the crowded prison cells filled with Black males and ever growing number of our Black girls, provide resources and most importantly hope for us all.

In this country, there is a definite divide between various ethnicities and cultures and anyone who says otherwise is not being totally honest with themselves. There is also a divide between the upper, middle, and lower class cultural groups. For example, one will see a division between upper, middle and lower class Black people. The lower class Blacks have no problem referring to themselves as Niggas, yet it is the rest of us who feel ashamed and outraged that these same people refer to their ladies as Hoes and Bitches. The popular, yet widely criticized rap group of the 90s, Niggas with Attitude or NWA, said, “Bitches ain’t shit but hoes and tricks,” which are the affectionate terms used by those in hood to identify women. I will not, cannot blame the cultural demise on rappers, however, there is blame for us all.

Everyone is to blame. Parents, churches, community so-called leaders, city, state and federal government, and when the fingers are all tapped out, we must look in the mirror and realize that we must take accountability for our own actions– every man, woman and child; white, black, and all of the colors, ethnicities in between.

In closing, there is a resources section found in this book. I do not ever want to hear another parent tell me, “They need to have more programs for these kids. It ain’t nothing for these kids to do.” I have always begged to differ with that opinion. There are tons of free activities found through the inner city. Many resource officers and community organizations grow bored sitting at the office waiting for the phones to ring. People are not tapping into the resources for jobs and activities. I also ask that you read this book with an open mind and pure heart so that we may begin to eradicate the fear, hopelessness and despair facing our people.

Ms. Warner’s book: The Mindsent of Niggas; Reaching the Unreachable is available on Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble via Nook for $3.99.

The People’s Champions
I’m Natosha Warner

A guide in understanding and aiding a culture of violence and destruction

Foreword
In urban America, it is a badge of honor to be called a “Nigga.” If you live in the inner city and you are not known as a “thug-ass Nigga,” you have no street credibility. If you have a job, attend school, get good grades and speak properly, you are most likely not heavily regarded, rather viewed as a square. A person with no street credibility gets no respect. To have respect is what one gets when he is getting paper (money), hoes or Bitches. Sadly enough, too many young and older people alike will spend their entire inner-city and incarcerated life attaining to be a Nigga who gets much street credibility.

People will be offended, outraged and I am sure a few protests, boycotts, marches and rallies will occur in response to this title. Great! I have achieved the goal. The goal is to anger people so much so that they do something that will evoke a positive change in the culture that all too well identifies themselves as Niggas.
What will be alarming is not the fact that there is a cultural demise occurring in urban America, however, that I had the audacity, the lack of class to entitle this book in such a way. If you have to wonder why I selected this title than you really have no idea about what is going on in urban America. Before one gets irate, indignant and be at the ready for protest, allow me to first borrow that angst for the usage of the word, “Nigga” and ask that people get angry, get up and become apart of a pre-existing movement that will allow us to help, and most importantly save our dying culture.

Many will wonder, why does a popular, white radio host get fired and protested against, yet this black woman gets to write a book with a title which includes such a hateful word. I am in no way singling out any specific person nor am humiliating a certain group of people. I say to you this, on the streets, which I will explore within the book’s contents are men, women and children who have adopted the mindset that one is not a real thug ass Nigga if he has not been incarcerated or in some cases shot, shot at or done the shooting.

When I first informed a few good friends and trusted colleagues of my intent to name this book, they attempted to dissuade me on the title. Others stated that this is the type of title that will grab someone’s attention. It is my hope that not only am I able to grab your attention but yet to encourage you so much so that you will join a movement to stop the endless flow of our people in and out of prison and the witnessing of endless tears and prayers at the ever too often, funerals.

In my defense of the book’s title, I am out there on the front line, devising campaigns to address the issues, taking valuable time away from my family, attending the marches, rallies, and candlelight vigils; therefore, I am allowed to use this word to describe to you what I see in this war. You see, don’t get upset with me for using this word if you are not in fact out on the front line with me. I will not apologize for explaining this culture in the manner in which I have chosen.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and various community organizations recently buried the word Nigga throughout the country. How can a word be buried if it lives on constantly every day in this culture? In a sense we buried alive a word that refuses to die. We can have ceremonies all day long, burying the word, yet the mentality breathes death into the lives of so many, each and every moment. I use this harmful word in the title not to judge, not to point fingers and call nasty-hurtful names, however so that we may grow and learn from those who often use this word, and who live the lifestyle of a culture filled with violence and sometimes a sense of hopelessness.

Comedian Chris Rock said, “I love Black people; but can’t stand Niggas.” Many Black people cringed when Mr. Rock stated his comments, and still we all knew good and well where he was coming from on this issue. Instead of us shaking our heads, rolling up our windows, locking our doors, and accelerating in our cars as we zoom through the hood to get away from those gloomy images standing on the corner with their baggy pants, braids in their hair, and 40-ounce bottles in their hands, let us come together and understand exactly how this culture operates.

This book will explore the lives of various people in the “hood,” it will provide insight as to what goes on behind the graffiti laden walls, the crowded prison cells filled with Black males and ever growing number of our Black girls, provide resources and most importantly hope for us all.

In this country, there is a definite divide between various ethnicities and cultures and anyone who says otherwise is not being totally honest with themselves. There is also a divide between the upper, middle, and lower class cultural groups. For example, one will see a division between upper, middle and lower class Black people. The lower class Blacks have no problem referring to themselves as Niggas, yet it is the rest of us who feel ashamed and outraged that these same people refer to their ladies as Hoes and Bitches. The popular, yet widely criticized rap group of the 90s, Niggas with Attitude or NWA, said, “Bitches ain’t shit but hoes and tricks,” which are the affectionate terms used by those in hood to identify women. I will not, cannot blame the cultural demise on rappers, however, there is blame for us all.

Everyone is to blame. Parents, churches, community so-called leaders, city, state and federal government, and when the fingers are all tapped out, we must look in the mirror and realize that we must take accountability for our own actions– every man, woman and child; white, black, and all of the colors, ethnicities in between.

In closing, there is a resources section found in this book. I do not ever want to hear another parent tell me, “They need to have more programs for these kids. It ain’t nothing for these kids to do.” I have always begged to differ with that opinion. There are tons of free activities found through the inner city. Many resource officers and community organizations grow bored sitting at the office waiting for the phones to ring. People are not tapping into the resources for jobs and activities. I also ask that you read this book with an open mind and pure heart so that we may begin to eradicate the fear, hopelessness and despair facing our people.

Ms. Warner’s book: The Mindsent of Niggas; Reaching the Unreachable is available on Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble via Nook for $3.99.

The People’s Champions
I’m Natosha Warner

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