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The Invasion Of Tradition: Why Are Whites Now Seeking Out Historically Black Colleges And Universities?

Historically Black Colleges and Universities were established in America shortly after the civil war to educate blacks in a segregted and racist society.

Several years ago I was in attendance of a job related function when I first became alarmed that HBCUs were possibly heading toward exstinction. As I strolled around the room interacting with many of the guest and dignitaries in attendance, I met a young man who was currently enrolled at Delaware State University. Our conversation started off with how much Dover, Delaware has grown since the onset of the town’s booming tourist industry. The conversation quickly became more intense as the young man advised me of the plan be the school’s current administration, to remove the HBCU status from being associated with the school. He explained the growing white student enrollment, and we talked about how times have changed. The conversation began to attract others at the function, most of whom were in fact also Alums from HBCUs. I was for the most part educated on the fact that such recruiting wasn’t unique to DSU, but in fact was a growing culture within various other HBCU marketing strategies designed to resolve many of these school’s financial troubles. I believe I walked away from that discussion enlightened and resolved that what I had learned was a fad, but I have come to realize that the issue is far more troublesome than I had originally anticipated. Since that time I have heard a few rumblings about the displeasure some have about the volume of white kids now attending Del State. Just a couple of days ago I became aware that a riot had allegedly occurred on campus just before the students broke for their spring Break. It has been reported that at issue was an effort by the DSU Administration to begin reducing black student enrollment while adopting a policy to issue 70% of their scholarships to white students. I wasn’t exactly sure how accurate that report was, but I became alarmed. I was certain that if such a plan was in fact in motion, that it would be met with strong opposition from the school’s alumni. Unfortunately, I have been shocked at some of the responses I read from classmates and others who posted about the subject. People have sent me private messages and emails expressing to me how they feel because they cited the fact that they didn’t have the energy to debate the subject in social media forums. I’ll share one perspective here:

“Dave, I can not believe the responses from our classmates.  I love the stances that you are taking.  I am writing privately because I currently do not have the energy to go back and forth with Negroes.  These people uphold these fraternities because it is their religion.  They can only quote people and events that have made a significant impact 40 years ago.  The whites are already controlling DSU.  We are the only race of people that do not preserve our history and culture until it is too late.  The honkies have the negoes right where they want them to be; chasing their images of success and singing kumbayah”.

I too was a little upset by some comments because I look at my friends list and I see how well accomplished the vast majority of them are. The positions they hold, their jobs, and reflect upon how many of these same individuals like me benefited from SEOG, PELL, and other Grants that afforded them the opportunity to attend College. The reason many choose Delaware State more than likely varies. The economy and high cost of tuition coupled with the lost of public funding, and even student loans are making it increasingly difficult for minorities and other poor kids to fund a college education. DSU and other HBCUs were founded on the sole principle of educating black students. Many of these schools have dealt with financial hardships over the years because of the lack of desire by African-Americans, primarily black males, to obtain a college degree.With that being said, I find it disturbing that blacks are now eager to throw away a tradition that paved the way for so many that might not otherwise have had the opportunity to attend college if it were not for the very same HBCU’s that they can now, it seems, so willingly discard, and accept the enrollment of white students in greater numbers than ever before. The reality is that the economy is now so bad that larger numbers of so-called affluent whites can no longer afford the pricey tuition that they have become accustom to, and suddenly the better traditionally black schools are being sought out by a reeling and financially strapped white community in their own phase of plan B. Though I find it extremely flattering that DSU is in fact considered one of the better black schools, I am admittedly not prepared to joyfully embrace such an acquisition, and roll out the welcome mat simply because white kids can no longer afford to attend institutions of higher learning that their community has diligently fought to keep exclusive to them only, for decades. Many will attempt to play the race card when considering my perspective, but I’ll utilize the thousands of Traditionally White Colleges and Universities (TWCU) who are not, have never exactly, and continue to discourage black enrollment into their institutions of higher learning as my sole premise for arriving at such a position. However, I am not misinformed on the exact cause of such issues impacting HBCUs. At the end of the day all schools must assess it’s bottom line, it’s cost to do business, and all along while attempting to maintain an affordable cost effect tuition that compliments it’s marketing of young minds seeking a quality education. So in short, it’s all about money. It’s shameful that black schools have reached such deplorable depths of viability in the recruitment of young black people to fill classrooms that were historically established to afford them educational growth. I am one of a minority unafraid to state on record that it is entirely our own fault by failing to properly prepare and motivate our kids for higher education. The reality of the matter is that there are such a demand for blacks in the collegiate arena, that HBCUs have no other choice but to begin marketing to other ethnic groups to keep the doors open and pay their bills. This is an extremely tough and bitter pill to swallow, but what angers me the most is the failure of  educators, and their executive bodies of HBCUs to demonstrate proactive measures to preempt falling black student enrollment long before such issues arise. Also, their apparent philosophy of “going white” as their primary backup plan. Yet, they share this burden with the parents of perspective students who have also failed to challenge their children to a higher standard of living and the pursuance of a college degree. Moreover, we most acknowledge other root causes keeping HBCUs strapped for cash. Many of the black schools have been operating strictly on public funding, and other federal dollars. State ‘s have historically stiffed many of these schools when allocating funding, each fiscal year has been more challenging for HBCUs since theses schools were established during the segregation eras of American culture, and the news flash should be that these practices of discouraging educational advancement of the black community have not dissipated. The American policy on black education whether in primary, secondary, or post secondary, has always, and continues to be predicated on racism. I can not believe our community, especially many of those who have matriculated through some of the very same struggling Historically Black Colleges and Universities can now boldly advocate such diversity when white schools will never adopt such policies. One of my best college friends stated the another night that, “whites shop for value and not color”. I am not convinced that whites value Delaware State’s educational programs  as better oppose to the University of Delaware or other major white schools, it’s simply a fact that white families are struggling now more than ever, and they can no longer afford those schools. We must fight to keep HBCUs because it’s our heritage and last line of defense in providing an affordable education for poor black people who may never obtain funding for higher education. How soon do we forget the roads we have traveled.

 

 

The People’s Champion

I’m David Adams

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. A recognized Journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
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Historically Black Colleges and Universities were established in America shortly after the civil war to educate blacks in a segregted and racist society.

Several years ago I was in attendance of a job related function when I first became alarmed that HBCUs were possibly heading toward exstinction. As I strolled around the room interacting with many of the guest and dignitaries in attendance, I met a young man who was currently enrolled at Delaware State University. Our conversation started off with how much Dover, Delaware has grown since the onset of the town’s booming tourist industry. The conversation quickly became more intense as the young man advised me of the plan be the school’s current administration, to remove the HBCU status from being associated with the school. He explained the growing white student enrollment, and we talked about how times have changed. The conversation began to attract others at the function, most of whom were in fact also Alums from HBCUs. I was for the most part educated on the fact that such recruiting wasn’t unique to DSU, but in fact was a growing culture within various other HBCU marketing strategies designed to resolve many of these school’s financial troubles. I believe I walked away from that discussion enlightened and resolved that what I had learned was a fad, but I have come to realize that the issue is far more troublesome than I had originally anticipated. Since that time I have heard a few rumblings about the displeasure some have about the volume of white kids now attending Del State. Just a couple of days ago I became aware that a riot had allegedly occurred on campus just before the students broke for their spring Break. It has been reported that at issue was an effort by the DSU Administration to begin reducing black student enrollment while adopting a policy to issue 70% of their scholarships to white students. I wasn’t exactly sure how accurate that report was, but I became alarmed. I was certain that if such a plan was in fact in motion, that it would be met with strong opposition from the school’s alumni. Unfortunately, I have been shocked at some of the responses I read from classmates and others who posted about the subject. People have sent me private messages and emails expressing to me how they feel because they cited the fact that they didn’t have the energy to debate the subject in social media forums. I’ll share one perspective here:

“Dave, I can not believe the responses from our classmates.  I love the stances that you are taking.  I am writing privately because I currently do not have the energy to go back and forth with Negroes.  These people uphold these fraternities because it is their religion.  They can only quote people and events that have made a significant impact 40 years ago.  The whites are already controlling DSU.  We are the only race of people that do not preserve our history and culture until it is too late.  The honkies have the negoes right where they want them to be; chasing their images of success and singing kumbayah”.

I too was a little upset by some comments because I look at my friends list and I see how well accomplished the vast majority of them are. The positions they hold, their jobs, and reflect upon how many of these same individuals like me benefited from SEOG, PELL, and other Grants that afforded them the opportunity to attend College. The reason many choose Delaware State more than likely varies. The economy and high cost of tuition coupled with the lost of public funding, and even student loans are making it increasingly difficult for minorities and other poor kids to fund a college education. DSU and other HBCUs were founded on the sole principle of educating black students. Many of these schools have dealt with financial hardships over the years because of the lack of desire by African-Americans, primarily black males, to obtain a college degree.With that being said, I find it disturbing that blacks are now eager to throw away a tradition that paved the way for so many that might not otherwise have had the opportunity to attend college if it were not for the very same HBCU’s that they can now, it seems, so willingly discard, and accept the enrollment of white students in greater numbers than ever before. The reality is that the economy is now so bad that larger numbers of so-called affluent whites can no longer afford the pricey tuition that they have become accustom to, and suddenly the better traditionally black schools are being sought out by a reeling and financially strapped white community in their own phase of plan B. Though I find it extremely flattering that DSU is in fact considered one of the better black schools, I am admittedly not prepared to joyfully embrace such an acquisition, and roll out the welcome mat simply because white kids can no longer afford to attend institutions of higher learning that their community has diligently fought to keep exclusive to them only, for decades. Many will attempt to play the race card when considering my perspective, but I’ll utilize the thousands of Traditionally White Colleges and Universities (TWCU) who are not, have never exactly, and continue to discourage black enrollment into their institutions of higher learning as my sole premise for arriving at such a position. However, I am not misinformed on the exact cause of such issues impacting HBCUs. At the end of the day all schools must assess it’s bottom line, it’s cost to do business, and all along while attempting to maintain an affordable cost effect tuition that compliments it’s marketing of young minds seeking a quality education. So in short, it’s all about money. It’s shameful that black schools have reached such deplorable depths of viability in the recruitment of young black people to fill classrooms that were historically established to afford them educational growth. I am one of a minority unafraid to state on record that it is entirely our own fault by failing to properly prepare and motivate our kids for higher education. The reality of the matter is that there are such a demand for blacks in the collegiate arena, that HBCUs have no other choice but to begin marketing to other ethnic groups to keep the doors open and pay their bills. This is an extremely tough and bitter pill to swallow, but what angers me the most is the failure of  educators, and their executive bodies of HBCUs to demonstrate proactive measures to preempt falling black student enrollment long before such issues arise. Also, their apparent philosophy of “going white” as their primary backup plan. Yet, they share this burden with the parents of perspective students who have also failed to challenge their children to a higher standard of living and the pursuance of a college degree. Moreover, we most acknowledge other root causes keeping HBCUs strapped for cash. Many of the black schools have been operating strictly on public funding, and other federal dollars. State ‘s have historically stiffed many of these schools when allocating funding, each fiscal year has been more challenging for HBCUs since theses schools were established during the segregation eras of American culture, and the news flash should be that these practices of discouraging educational advancement of the black community have not dissipated. The American policy on black education whether in primary, secondary, or post secondary, has always, and continues to be predicated on racism. I can not believe our community, especially many of those who have matriculated through some of the very same struggling Historically Black Colleges and Universities can now boldly advocate such diversity when white schools will never adopt such policies. One of my best college friends stated the another night that, “whites shop for value and not color”. I am not convinced that whites value Delaware State’s educational programs  as better oppose to the University of Delaware or other major white schools, it’s simply a fact that white families are struggling now more than ever, and they can no longer afford those schools. We must fight to keep HBCUs because it’s our heritage and last line of defense in providing an affordable education for poor black people who may never obtain funding for higher education. How soon do we forget the roads we have traveled.

 

 

The People’s Champion

I’m David Adams

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. A recognized Journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

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2 Responses to “The Invasion Of Tradition: Why Are Whites Now Seeking Out Historically Black Colleges And Universities?”

  1. Don’t wear seat belts lest you drown in your own urine?

  2. Mary Worthey says:

    Don’t wear seat belts lest you drown in your own urine?

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