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The Phylicia Barnes Murder Trial: Blue Tote Mystery Bolsters Prosecution’s Murder Theory In Barnes Killing

The jury seated in the Phylicia Barnes murder trial worked through festive celebrations for the hometown Baltimore Ravens after the team won another Super Bowl Title, as hundreds of thousands lined the streets in one of the city’s proudest moments in professional sports history. The chaotic scene in downtown didn’t deter the 12 panel jury from being focused on the business at hand. Deliberations continued in the Phylicia Barnes murder trial in which Michael Johnson is the honor teen’s accused killer. Jurors reportedly brought their lunch back to the courthouse and worked through their scheduled break, a common practice in Baltimore’s judicial process. In the afternoon the jury sent word to judge Alfred Nance that they were experiencing difficulty viewing  the video evidence introduced during the trial. A laptop which was given to the jury couldn’t be utilized because they didn’t have the password, and a TV was also requested so they could view the sex tape and a surveillance video which depicted Johnson purchasing a blue tote from a local Wal-Mart. Prosecutors have alleged that Johnson carried the pretty little girl’s body out of her half-siblings apartment, in a blue tote, and after he had killed her on the day she disappeared. They also say neighbors in the building observed him struggling to carry a tote in the hallway of the building around the time he told police he last saw the child alive. His defense has always maintained that Johnson was only caring personal belongings from the apartment after having been requested to move out, following his breakup with the teen’s sister Deena Barnes, who he dated for 10 years, and cited that witnesses could not testify to what was actually inside the tote Johnson was carrying. The two contrasting arguments leave doubt on both sides when considering these perspectives objectively, but Deena Barnes’ statement to police during the investigation in which she told cops that a large blue tote was missing from her apartment creates a compelling argument that Johnson may have had a reason to discard the container. Prosecuyors had attempted to demonstrate in open court during the trial how a person of Barnes’ size could have fit inside the container Johnson was observed purchasing. Judge Nance denied the state’ request to show the demonstration to the jury because the tote Johnson allegedly purchased on that day has never been found. A competent jury should ask three basic questions related to the mysterious blue tote evidence:

1. Where is the tote that Deena Barnes says is missing from her apartment?

2. Where is the tote that Michael Johnson was observed purchasing at Wal-Mart the day Phylicia Barnes disappeared?

3.Did the tote Johnson purchased end up back in Deena’s apartment as a replacement for the one she said was missing?

These are all logical and rational questions that should be asked prior to even considering the limited tote evidence the judge allowed to be presented to the jury. Cops say Deena Barnes gave them a tote during the investigation, and sources tell TPC that the tote appears to be smaller than the one she owned, and may have tipped cops off to his Wal-Mart purchase after reviewing Johnson’ cellphone GPS data on that day. The more important question should now be asked why Johnson replaced the tote, if that’s in fact what happened. Also, why was the missing tote discarded in the first place? The fact that the tote was never found may assist Johnson’ defense because the court won’t allow certain evidence in court, but it raises tremendous suspicion as to why it suddenly disappeared. Realistically speaking, Johnson’ defense claim he was only moving personal belongings inside that tote, but why haven’t his counsel produced even a mere rationalization explaining how it simply disappeared. It is very possible that Johnson made certain that the tote was never found because it would reveal valuable DNA forensic evidence linking  the Barnes teen body to the tote, and possibly Johnson’ own DNA as well. On day 3 of Deliberations in the Phylicia Barnes murder trial the question of the day is “where is the blue tote?” The fact that it has never been found creates a hell of an argument that Johnson may have carried the child’s body out of the building inside it as prosecutors have alleged, and  he also may have made certain that it would never be found again. A verdict may come at anytime. Praying for justice for young Phylicia Simone Barnes.

 

 

The People’s Champion

I’m David Adams

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. A recognized Journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
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The jury seated in the Phylicia Barnes murder trial worked through festive celebrations for the hometown Baltimore Ravens after the team won another Super Bowl Title, as hundreds of thousands lined the streets in one of the city’s proudest moments in professional sports history. The chaotic scene in downtown didn’t deter the 12 panel jury from being focused on the business at hand. Deliberations continued in the Phylicia Barnes murder trial in which Michael Johnson is the honor teen’s accused killer. Jurors reportedly brought their lunch back to the courthouse and worked through their scheduled break, a common practice in Baltimore’s judicial process. In the afternoon the jury sent word to judge Alfred Nance that they were experiencing difficulty viewing  the video evidence introduced during the trial. A laptop which was given to the jury couldn’t be utilized because they didn’t have the password, and a TV was also requested so they could view the sex tape and a surveillance video which depicted Johnson purchasing a blue tote from a local Wal-Mart. Prosecutors have alleged that Johnson carried the pretty little girl’s body out of her half-siblings apartment, in a blue tote, and after he had killed her on the day she disappeared. They also say neighbors in the building observed him struggling to carry a tote in the hallway of the building around the time he told police he last saw the child alive. His defense has always maintained that Johnson was only caring personal belongings from the apartment after having been requested to move out, following his breakup with the teen’s sister Deena Barnes, who he dated for 10 years, and cited that witnesses could not testify to what was actually inside the tote Johnson was carrying. The two contrasting arguments leave doubt on both sides when considering these perspectives objectively, but Deena Barnes’ statement to police during the investigation in which she told cops that a large blue tote was missing from her apartment creates a compelling argument that Johnson may have had a reason to discard the container. Prosecuyors had attempted to demonstrate in open court during the trial how a person of Barnes’ size could have fit inside the container Johnson was observed purchasing. Judge Nance denied the state’ request to show the demonstration to the jury because the tote Johnson allegedly purchased on that day has never been found. A competent jury should ask three basic questions related to the mysterious blue tote evidence:

1. Where is the tote that Deena Barnes says is missing from her apartment?

2. Where is the tote that Michael Johnson was observed purchasing at Wal-Mart the day Phylicia Barnes disappeared?

3.Did the tote Johnson purchased end up back in Deena’s apartment as a replacement for the one she said was missing?

These are all logical and rational questions that should be asked prior to even considering the limited tote evidence the judge allowed to be presented to the jury. Cops say Deena Barnes gave them a tote during the investigation, and sources tell TPC that the tote appears to be smaller than the one she owned, and may have tipped cops off to his Wal-Mart purchase after reviewing Johnson’ cellphone GPS data on that day. The more important question should now be asked why Johnson replaced the tote, if that’s in fact what happened. Also, why was the missing tote discarded in the first place? The fact that the tote was never found may assist Johnson’ defense because the court won’t allow certain evidence in court, but it raises tremendous suspicion as to why it suddenly disappeared. Realistically speaking, Johnson’ defense claim he was only moving personal belongings inside that tote, but why haven’t his counsel produced even a mere rationalization explaining how it simply disappeared. It is very possible that Johnson made certain that the tote was never found because it would reveal valuable DNA forensic evidence linking  the Barnes teen body to the tote, and possibly Johnson’ own DNA as well. On day 3 of Deliberations in the Phylicia Barnes murder trial the question of the day is “where is the blue tote?” The fact that it has never been found creates a hell of an argument that Johnson may have carried the child’s body out of the building inside it as prosecutors have alleged, and  he also may have made certain that it would never be found again. A verdict may come at anytime. Praying for justice for young Phylicia Simone Barnes.

 

 

The People’s Champion

I’m David Adams

David Adams

Self proclaimed geek, Advocate for the homeless, Social Change, Crime Blogger, and mobile technology enthusiast. A recognized Journalist and Human Interest Writer championing the plight of the masses whom are without a voice of their own.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle Plus

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